Mayuzumi, Toshiro There are 2 products.

Toshiro Mayuzumi,   (born Feb. 20, 1929, Yokohama, Japan—died April 10, 1997, Kawasaki, Japan), Japanese composer who , combined avant-garde Western instrumentation and techniques with traditional Japanese music and established a long-standing reputation for experimentation and eclecticism. Mayuzumi studied at what is now the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music from 1945 to 1951, a period when Western music was widespread and accessible because of the American occupation. His early works revealed a number of influences, ranging from jazz rhythms in Hors d’oeuvre (1947) to Balinese music in Sphenogrammes (1951), which received international acclaim after it was performed in Frankfurt, W.Ger. In 1951 he studied briefly with Tony Aubin at the Paris Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique. Upon his return to Tokyo in 1952, he introduced into Japanese music modern musical trends and techniques, notably those of John Cage. Mayuzumi’s Shusaku I (1955; Study I) represented the first Japanese example of synthetic electronic music, and X,Y,Z (1955) became the first Japanese work to use musique concrète, a modernist technique consisting of a recorded montage of electronically altered natural sounds. A significant change occurred in Mayuzumi’s career in the late 1950s when he turned back to traditional Japanese music to find models for his work. Nirvana Symphony (1958) was based on the sounds made by Buddhist temple bells, and Bugaku (1962) imitated the sounds and rhythms of the court dance that was part of traditional gagaku music. Along with other artists, including novelist Yukio Mishima, he became an outspoken critic of the Westernization of his country and attempted to redefine a Japanese cultural identity by nurturing unique Japanese qualities in his art. Mayuzumi also composed for the symphony and the ballet as well as for theatre and films.

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 items
Showing 1 - 2 of 2 items